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DOS/AMAP Model of the DOS Control Program

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000075224D
Original Publication Date: 1971-Aug-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2005-Feb-24
Document File: 2 page(s) / 13K

Publishing Venue

IBM

Related People

Morse, HL: AUTHOR [+3]

Abstract

The Disk Operating System/Advanced Multiprogramming Analysis Procedure (DOS/AMAP) is a set of integrated programs and techniques for measuring thruput performance of a DOS environment. DOS/AMAP consists of a real-time trace, a set of data reduction programs and an event-driven model of the DOS Control Program. The DOS/AMAP Model is used to simulate the logic and functions of the DOS Control Program, Release 24.

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DOS/AMAP Model of the DOS Control Program

The Disk Operating System/Advanced Multiprogramming Analysis Procedure (DOS/AMAP) is a set of integrated programs and techniques for measuring thruput performance of a DOS environment. DOS/AMAP consists of a real-time trace, a set of data reduction programs and an event-driven model of the DOS Control Program. The DOS/AMAP Model is used to simulate the logic and functions of the DOS Control Program, Release 24.

The Model is driven by event record's which were previously captured by the DOS/AMAP Trace program. These records consist of performance-oriented data captured while jobs were running in a real DOS environment. The DOS/AMAP Model is used to simulate how these same jobs would run in a "modeled" environment -- a modeled environment being one where the user can control the hardware configuration, various supervisor options, and the priority and order of the problem programs. The modeled environment may reflect the effects of some desired changes to the real environment or thruput measurements of a nonexistent environment.

The DOS/AMAP Model has several unique characteristics which include: 1) Modeling of DASD operations by simulating the entire command chain. This improves accuracy in modeling

any access method employing command chains containing

more than a single transfer of data. 2) Use of a page image allows precise modeling of skipping, spacing and/or print operations occurring

within a single command chain. 3) Multiple reads and/or writes in a single command chain are modeled for all DOS/AMAP-supported devices. 4) Exact block lengths are used in modeling each I/O operation. 5) Operator console response time is modeled exactly as it occurred in the real environme...