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Automatic Tree Diagrams for Grammatical Structures

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000075265D
Original Publication Date: 1971-Aug-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2005-Feb-24
Document File: 2 page(s) / 48K

Publishing Venue

IBM

Related People

Hochhauser, MC: AUTHOR

Abstract

A diagram of a tree may be automatically printed by a computer system using this computer programmable technique. The tree structure information input used by the subject diagramming technique may be provided from any source, such as from a compiler parsing program. This input can be called a set of subduction rules, and when reversed, can completely recreate the original grammatical structure. Fig. 4 provides a flow diagram of a computer program using the technique, as follows: Input 10 is a set of subduction rules in machine readable form conforming to any formally defined language and created by any known technique. These rules are reversed in step 15 and a hierarchy table of successor relationships is created. During this phase potentially conflicting relationships are flagged for later evaluation.

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Automatic Tree Diagrams for Grammatical Structures

A diagram of a tree may be automatically printed by a computer system using this computer programmable technique. The tree structure information input used by the subject diagramming technique may be provided from any source, such as from a compiler parsing program. This input can be called a set of subduction rules, and when reversed, can completely recreate the original grammatical structure. Fig. 4 provides a flow diagram of a computer program using the technique, as follows: Input 10 is a set of subduction rules in machine readable form conforming to any formally defined language and created by any known technique. These rules are reversed in step 15 and a hierarchy table of successor relationships is created. During this phase potentially conflicting relationships are flagged for later evaluation. In step 20 the terminal symbols of this hierarchy table are compared to the original structure. If step 25 detects a nonequal comparison, then step 30 attempts to resolve the previously flagged conflicting relationships. Step 20 is again invoked. When the hierarchy table is correct, step 35 assigns to each node of the tree a line number, a position within the line and a lateral arm length (L.A.L.) to each successor. The L.A.L. is determined by switch 37 as follows: Step 40 selects the L.A.L. to each successor as a geometric progression from the bottom of the tree to the top (see Fig. 1). Step 45 selects the L.A.L....