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Multiple Frequency Acousto Optical Deflector/Modulator

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000075274D
Original Publication Date: 1971-Aug-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2005-Feb-24
Document File: 2 page(s) / 13K

Publishing Venue

IBM

Related People

Rabedeau, ME: AUTHOR

Abstract

Acoustical light deflectors and modulators employ a single-acoustical frequency or a time-varying acoustical frequency to deflect or modulate the beam. There are distinct advantages to using several frequencies simultaneously, such as: 1. In some data display applications a series of frequencies is used to produce a multiplicity of spots in the output, each independently modulatable by modulating the power at the frequency that gives rise to the particular spot.

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Multiple Frequency Acousto Optical Deflector/Modulator

Acoustical light deflectors and modulators employ a single-acoustical frequency or a time-varying acoustical frequency to deflect or modulate the beam. There are distinct advantages to using several frequencies simultaneously, such as:
1. In some data display applications a series of frequencies

is used to produce

a multiplicity of spots in the output, each independently

modulatable by modulating the power at the frequency

that gives rise to the

particular spot. Thus, for example, a line of characters

can be displayed by producing a multiplicity of spots in a

vertical line that is as long as the characters are high,

modulating each spot

as required to form the characters as the spots are

caused to scan in the horizontal direction by a rotating

mirror or other

suitable light deflector. The advantage of the use of the

multiplicity of acoustical frequencies (and therefore

the multiplicity of output

spots) is (a) that when used in conjunction with a

horizontal deflector, the horizontal deflector may

operate at a speed

that is inversely proportional to the number of output

spots for very high-speed scanning, (b) the rise time

required in

the modulator for a given density scan is proportional to

the number of spots used, (c) within the multiplicity

of spots, horizontal jitter

is essentially eliminated because each spot

is deflected horizontally simultaneously by the same

deflector (facet of rotating mirror, for exa...