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Making Resist Stencils from Photographic Stripping Films

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000075302D
Original Publication Date: 1971-Aug-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2005-Feb-24
Document File: 1 page(s) / 11K

Publishing Venue

IBM

Related People

Faigenbaum, MA: AUTHOR [+3]

Abstract

This is a process for making resist masks from photographic film. The separable layers of a photographic stripping film, consisting of a composite of a layer of sensitive unexposed emulsion (e.g. silver halide) carried upon a permanent support layer (e.g. cellulose nitrate) are stripped from the temporary support layer and smoothly adhered to an object surface, with the permanent support layer adjacent the surface. The emulsion layer successively receives image-wise exposure to light in a fast exposure process, photographic development and relief development; the last by an etch-bleach process. The underlying support layer is dissolved image-wise with high-fidelity through the relief stencil in the emulsion layer. Exposed areas of the object surface then receive aqueous based process handling (e.g.

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Making Resist Stencils from Photographic Stripping Films

This is a process for making resist masks from photographic film. The separable layers of a photographic stripping film, consisting of a composite of a layer of sensitive unexposed emulsion (e.g. silver halide) carried upon a permanent support layer (e.g. cellulose nitrate) are stripped from the temporary support layer and smoothly adhered to an object surface, with the permanent support layer adjacent the surface. The emulsion layer successively receives image-wise exposure to light in a fast exposure process, photographic development and relief development; the last by an etch-bleach process. The underlying support layer is dissolved image-wise with high-fidelity through the relief stencil in the emulsion layer. Exposed areas of the object surface then receive aqueous based process handling (e.g. etching or plating) through the aqueous resistant composite master stencil formed by the emulsion and support layers.

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