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Browse Prior Art Database

Low Temperature Preparation of Porous Metal Structure

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000075335D
Original Publication Date: 1971-Sep-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2005-Feb-24
Document File: 2 page(s) / 44K

Publishing Venue

IBM

Related People

Schmeckenbecher, AF: AUTHOR

Abstract

A slurry comprising finely powdered silver sulfate 1 and filler particles 2 in a saturated solution of silver sulfate in water (or of another silver compound in a suitable solvent) is deposited as a layer on substrate 3 by casting, brushing, spraying, etc. The filler particles 2 are volatile and decompose into volatile compounds above about 300 degrees C. An example is anthraquinone. The filler particles are preferably +40, -150 mesh size, the silver sulfate particles are preferably -250 mesh size.

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Low Temperature Preparation of Porous Metal Structure

A slurry comprising finely powdered silver sulfate 1 and filler particles 2 in a saturated solution of silver sulfate in water (or of another silver compound in a suitable solvent) is deposited as a layer on substrate 3 by casting, brushing, spraying, etc. The filler particles 2 are volatile and decompose into volatile compounds above about 300 degrees C. An example is anthraquinone. The filler particles are preferably +40, -150 mesh size, the silver sulfate particles are preferably -250 mesh size.

The solvent is evaporated and the mixture is heated in a reducing atmosphere, e. g. forming gas, to 300 degrees C or more. The filler material volatilizes. The silver sulfate, without melting (melting point 652 degrees C), is reduced to a matrix of metal sponge which has cavities of controlled size in the spots where filler particles 2 formerly existed.

The structure is mechanically strong and adheres well to metal substrates, and avoids the problems of conventional porous metal structures which are made by sintering metal particles at temperatures not too far below the melting point of the metal itself.

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