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Glass Ceramic and Glass Metal Structures

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000075368D
Original Publication Date: 1971-Sep-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2005-Feb-24
Document File: 1 page(s) / 12K

Publishing Venue

IBM

Related People

Langston, PR: AUTHOR [+2]

Abstract

The method involves establishing equilibrium solubilities of ceramics or metals in glass at the processing temperature of glass-ceramic/metal structures by deliberately adding the ceramic/metal in fine powder form to the glass, and saturating the glass with the ceramic/metal at temperatures above the processing temperature of the structure.

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Glass Ceramic and Glass Metal Structures

The method involves establishing equilibrium solubilities of ceramics or metals in glass at the processing temperature of glass-ceramic/metal structures by deliberately adding the ceramic/metal in fine powder form to the glass, and saturating the glass with the ceramic/metal at temperatures above the processing temperature of the structure.

Metal oxides are usually soluble in glasses at high temperatures so that when ceramics or metals are glazed at temperatures where viscosity of glass is about 10/6/ poises, glasses dissolve ceramics and metal oxides to form intermediate layers of glass of composition and properties different from those of original glass. This results in an uncontrollable situation in which reaction or dissolution between glass and ceramic/metal takes place to saturation at the interface, followed by diffusion of ceramic or metal ions into bulk glass. A method is described by which this uncontrollable situation can be reduced or eliminated.

The method is applicable to any glass-ceramic/metal combinations. Typical examples include: 1) additions of about 1.03 wt % of nickel-zinc ferrite to a lead glass and dissolving at 1200 degrees C for 4 hours. The resulting glass etches ferrite structures at a rate of less than 12 microinches per hour, as compared to about 100 microinches per hour when no deliberate saturation is performed. 2) additions of about 0.4 wt % chromium to a borosilicate glass and dissolving a...