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Program Logic Table PLOT Programming Method

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000075384D
Original Publication Date: 1971-Sep-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2005-Feb-24
Document File: 2 page(s) / 23K

Publishing Venue

IBM

Related People

Vivian, RL: AUTHOR

Abstract

The Program LOgic Table (PLOT) method is a programming technique designed to reduce the amount of programming and testing effort required where two or more programs have some similarities of function, or where two or more routines in a program have partially similar functions.

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Program Logic Table PLOT Programming Method

The Program LOgic Table (PLOT) method is a programming technique designed to reduce the amount of programming and testing effort required where two or more programs have some similarities of function, or where two or more routines in a program have partially similar functions.

For purposes of this description, two programs with similarity of functions could be, e.g., one that analyzes an incoming detail record in an accounts receivable application, and reads and updates a customer record, and another that analyzes an incoming detail record in a payroll application, and reads and updates an employee record.

Routines with similar functions could be, e.g., routines to move different data fields, each to a different location, or to test different fields, each according to its own specifications.

In order to develop new routines or programs to be used in the PLOT method, the programmer must first analyze the processing to be performed on several different possible fields to determine what similarities there are in the processing.

Then he must develop simultaneously a set of instructions and a set of parameters. The instructions are generalized in that they will work on whatever field is indicated by a parameter (i.e., a relative address or pointer), and wherever necessary they will look to the parameters for an indication of what logic to follow or what related constants to use in order to process that field (see Table 1).

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