Browse Prior Art Database

Formatted Query for Index Search

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000075387D
Original Publication Date: 1971-Sep-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2005-Feb-24
Document File: 3 page(s) / 40K

Publishing Venue

IBM

Related People

Smith, LG: AUTHOR

Abstract

The simplification of a detailed search-compare operation is achieved by formatting query statements and using a register to keep count of the character number being analyzed within a word, with the result being the capability of accessing immediately the next query word or the beginning of the present query word, since the position of the search operation is known.

This text was extracted from a PDF file.
At least one non-text object (such as an image or picture) has been suppressed.
This is the abbreviated version, containing approximately 52% of the total text.

Page 1 of 3

Formatted Query for Index Search

The simplification of a detailed search-compare operation is achieved by formatting query statements and using a register to keep count of the character number being analyzed within a word, with the result being the capability of accessing immediately the next query word or the beginning of the present query word, since the position of the search operation is known.

In present search-compare operations, the type of query statement is the logical product, i.e., A and B and C, where all are required to be found within a record for the entire query statement to be a match. Here A, B, and C are each query words. The query words are entered into a serial buffer and separated with a lower case space, with the last word being followed by a carrier return. During setup, a lower case space is automatically placed in front of the first query word.

During the search-compare operation, a record word is compared on a character-to-character basis with each query word, and when a query word is found to be a match, the lower case space preceding it is changed to an upper case space. A subsequent tally of the spaces is made to determine how many query words have been matched. As the tally is made, the upper case spaces are changed back to the lower case to condition the query for the next record search.

The length of the query in terms of characters and spaces is generally limited to a large number, while the length of any word is not restricted. With this being the case, the actual time consumed due to a large number of program steps can exceed the amount of time required to read a record, particularly when a Magnetic Card "Selectric" Typewriter card reader is used and a track stepping operation to the next track is required. The most important problem here is related to the program step executions necessary to move within the query looking for either the beginning of the current word or the beginning of the next word, since at this time the next character must be analyzed to determine whether it is a space or a carrier return. Also, since the current position relative to the b...