Browse Prior Art Database

Silicon Reed Electromechanical Oscillator

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000075455D
Original Publication Date: 1971-Sep-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2005-Feb-24
Document File: 2 page(s) / 33K

Publishing Venue

IBM

Related People

Berry, BS: AUTHOR

Abstract

The vibrating element of a known electromechanical oscillator is a thin reed of silicon. This is bonded at one end to a support pedestal which in turn projects from a base module, as shown in Fig. 1. An integrated drive resistor and strain-gauge detector together with appropriate feedback electronics complete the arrangement of the oscillator. Two geometrical designs are suggested for the silicon element of the electromechanical oscillator. These designs, which are shown in Figs. 2 and 3, have the specific feature that they avoid a bond or joint at the root of the reed. This is accomplished by making the reed an integral part of a larger piece, which in turn can be clipped or clamped C in a relatively noncritical manner to the base module. As shown by Figs.

This text was extracted from a PDF file.
At least one non-text object (such as an image or picture) has been suppressed.
This is the abbreviated version, containing approximately 100% of the total text.

Page 1 of 2

Silicon Reed Electromechanical Oscillator

The vibrating element of a known electromechanical oscillator is a thin reed of silicon. This is bonded at one end to a support pedestal which in turn projects from a base module, as shown in Fig. 1. An integrated drive resistor and strain- gauge detector together with appropriate feedback electronics complete the arrangement of the oscillator. Two geometrical designs are suggested for the silicon element of the electromechanical oscillator. These designs, which are shown in Figs. 2 and 3, have the specific feature that they avoid a bond or joint at the root of the reed. This is accomplished by making the reed an integral part of a larger piece, which in turn can be clipped or clamped C in a relatively noncritical manner to the base module. As shown by Figs. 2 and 3, such an integral support-plus-reed assembly can be fabricated from standard wafer stock by making two parallel cuts in a starting blank. In Fig. 2 the cuts are placed so that the reed formed between them has a "fixed-free" (cantilever) configuration. Alternatively, Fig. 3 shows the arrangement for a "fixed-fixed" reed.

Compared with the standard arrangement of Fig. 1, the advantages of the designs of Figs. 2 and 3 are (a) greater inherent reliability, (b) higher mechanical Q, and (c) ability to set the operating frequency with greater precision.

1

Page 2 of 2

2

[This page contains 2 pictures or other non-text objects]