Browse Prior Art Database

Common Base Switching Circuit with Self Contained Voltage Generator

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000075459D
Original Publication Date: 1971-Sep-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2005-Feb-24
Document File: 2 page(s) / 35K

Publishing Venue

IBM

Related People

Gerbitz, CG: AUTHOR

Abstract

This circuit includes driver Section 1, inverter Section 2, and voltage generator Section 3. Section 3 provides a voltage source which may be used for other circuits.

This text was extracted from a PDF file.
At least one non-text object (such as an image or picture) has been suppressed.
This is the abbreviated version, containing approximately 81% of the total text.

Page 1 of 2

Common Base Switching Circuit with Self Contained Voltage Generator

This circuit includes driver Section 1, inverter Section 2, and voltage generator Section 3. Section 3 provides a voltage source which may be used for other circuits.

Section 1 drives Q3 so that when the signal at A varies between ground and some positive voltage, the input to Q3 at C varies between some positive voltage and a negative voltage approximately equal to the voltage across D1 and D2. D1, D2, D3 determine the offset of the base of Q2 below the input at A, and D3 determines the voltage difference between the base terminals of Q1 and Q2. R1 serves to keep C1 charged to the voltage developed across D1 + D2 + D3. This voltage across C1 is used to drive the base of Q3 negative with respect to the lower level of the input at A.

Section 2 is a common-base switching circuit where Q4 is the high-voltage switch and Q3 is the driver for the switch.

V1 sets the clamping level through D5, limiting the potentials developed by leakage inductance and the magnetizing inductances in output transformer T1 as Q4 is cut off. R3 serves as a sink for the energy released from the inductances.

Section 3 serves to generate a negative voltage. If C2 and D4 were interchanged, the voltage would be positive. R2 converts voltage pulses at C of Q3 to current pulses at D. A pulsating voltage is produced across R2 in this process, and this is used to develop a DC voltage across C2 by operation of D4. This voltage suppl...