Browse Prior Art Database

Composite Read/Write Recording Head

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000075481D
Original Publication Date: 1971-Sep-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2005-Feb-24
Document File: 2 page(s) / 35K

Publishing Venue

IBM

Related People

Valstyn, EP: AUTHOR

Abstract

In high-track-density recording, mechanical tolerance problems arise when separate read and write heads are used. Proper positioning of corresponding read and write heads with respect to each other, especially the azimuth control of the gaps, is very difficult. These difficulties are obviated by depositing, by photolithographic techniques, a magnetic-film write head and a magnetic-film read head on the same substrate. Azimuthal orientation of the two gaps presents no difficulty, since both heads are on the same substrate.

This text was extracted from a PDF file.
At least one non-text object (such as an image or picture) has been suppressed.
This is the abbreviated version, containing approximately 76% of the total text.

Page 1 of 2

Composite Read/Write Recording Head

In high-track-density recording, mechanical tolerance problems arise when separate read and write heads are used. Proper positioning of corresponding read and write heads with respect to each other, especially the azimuth control of the gaps, is very difficult. These difficulties are obviated by depositing, by photolithographic techniques, a magnetic-film write head and a magnetic-film read head on the same substrate. Azimuthal orientation of the two gaps presents no difficulty, since both heads are on the same substrate.

As shown, a magnetic film 10 is deposited on a nonmagnetic substrate 11, preferably of a nonporous ceramic material. Using known etching and masking techniques, a first electrical conductor 12 is deposited on film 10 and an insulating layer 13, preferably of silicon dioxide, is deposited on the conductor 12 and the film 10. A second magnetic film 14 is then deposited over the insulator 13, thus creating a write gap 15 between the two films 10 and 14. A second conductor 16 is selectively deposited over the film 14 and a third magnetic layer 17 is deposited over conductor 16, thus creating a read gap 18 between magnetic films 14 and 17. The back gap formed by the insulating layer 13 in the write section of the head can be tolerated, if the insulator is sufficiently thin compared with the height of the magnetic film 10 above the conductor 12.

Since the gap length of the write head does not strongly affect its res...