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Deflection Gauge for Sheet Metal Tension

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000075549D
Original Publication Date: 1971-Oct-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2005-Feb-24
Document File: 2 page(s) / 40K

Publishing Venue

IBM

Related People

Guggenheim, RC: AUTHOR

Abstract

The deflection gauge shown is able to obtain consistent repeatability of the tension level of sheet metal, such as a semiconductor crystal slicing blade.

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Deflection Gauge for Sheet Metal Tension

The deflection gauge shown is able to obtain consistent repeatability of the tension level of sheet metal, such as a semiconductor crystal slicing blade.

The deflection gauge comprises machined metal housing 1, preferably of aluminum, on which is mounted dial test indicator 2 of the Browne & Sharp "Bes Test" (R) type. Capability for zero-adjustment is provided by clamp adaptor and fine thread adjusting screw 3. A 150 gram reference weight 4 is mounted on shaft 8 which is aligned by two thin spring steel discs 5 retained within housing 1, which provides direct contact of known weight directly to (and in the same direction as the deflection) carbide ball 9 of the dial test indicator. The indicator set at "0" prior to application of weight 4. Thus the spring force of the indicator is nullified, and the 150 grams is the total force measured. The base of the tool is properly referenced to sheet metal element 10 by two reference pins 6, which contact the edge of the sheet metal element.

In operation, the indicator is set to zero, and the weight lowered by cam action into contact with indicator ball 9 which is positioned on sheet metal surface
10. The total deflection of the sheet metal element is transmitted through lever arm 11 the the indicator 2, where total deflection can be read out from the indicator in ten thousandths of an inch increments.

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