Browse Prior Art Database

Core Replacement Tool

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000075578D
Original Publication Date: 1971-Oct-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2005-Feb-24
Document File: 2 page(s) / 68K

Publishing Venue

IBM

Related People

Orlandi, JV: AUTHOR [+2]

Abstract

A ferrite core storage plane for a data processing apparatus may include a ground plane or other sheet of material, coated with thermoplastic in which the edge portions of the cores are embedded. A construction of this kind is illustrated in the IBM Technical Disclosure Bulletin, Vol. 11, No. 7 (December, 1968) page 726. The array of cores may be assembled to the thermoplastic coated sheet by use of a matrix, as shown in that publication, but it is also desirable to have a means to place cores into the assembly one by one, in an accurate manner. Such a means can be used, for example, to bond new cores in place on the thermoplastic coated sheet in place of damaged or missing cores.

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Core Replacement Tool

A ferrite core storage plane for a data processing apparatus may include a ground plane or other sheet of material, coated with thermoplastic in which the edge portions of the cores are embedded. A construction of this kind is illustrated in the IBM Technical Disclosure Bulletin, Vol. 11, No. 7 (December, 1968) page 726. The array of cores may be assembled to the thermoplastic coated sheet by use of a matrix, as shown in that publication, but it is also desirable to have a means to place cores into the assembly one by one, in an accurate manner. Such a means can be used, for example, to bond new cores in place on the thermoplastic coated sheet in place of damaged or missing cores.

This core replacement tool has a magnetic chuck, which holds the miniature ferrite core while applying heat to the core so that it can be embedded into the thin thermoplastic coating. Suitable X, Y and Z controls, not shown, reciprocate the tool from a supply of cores to individually assigned core positions on the core plane being repaired.

The tool itself consists of a U shaped permanent magnet 1, a heating element 2 and a nonmagnetic mounting cartridge 3. The two poles of the magnet are ground flat with the surface forming an included angle of about 60 degrees. The magnetic flux between the poles attracts and holds the ferrite core 4 securely within the 60 degree wedge formed by the magnetic poles. While 4 is being positioned, 2 transfers heat via 3 and 1 to 4. T...