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Browse Prior Art Database

Freeing Computer CPU's During Computer Controlled Real Time Operations

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000075638D
Original Publication Date: 1971-Oct-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2005-Feb-24
Document File: 2 page(s) / 52K

Publishing Venue

IBM

Related People

Harris, MJ: AUTHOR

Abstract

The present program provides an approach for freeing the CPU (Control Processing Unit) in a computer controlled physical or mechanical operation during the period required for carrying out discrete physical and mechanical operations. Because CPU time is highly expensive, it is a prevalent philosophy in programming to attempt to free the CPU for the maximum possible time.

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Freeing Computer CPU's During Computer Controlled Real Time Operations

The present program provides an approach for freeing the CPU (Control Processing Unit) in a computer controlled physical or mechanical operation during the period required for carrying out discrete physical and mechanical operations. Because CPU time is highly expensive, it is a prevalent philosophy in programming to attempt to free the CPU for the maximum possible time.

In conventional practice, when the computer controls a real-time operation, e.g., a stepping motor for translational movement, after a command or series of commands is issued to the system, the program then frees the CPU. Then, upon completion of the command, a feedback from the mechanical system results in an interrupt which reassumes control of the CPU.

In accordance with the present program, in situations where the mechanical or physical operations commanded by the CPU can be carried out during a predetermined time interval, it has been found that no such feedback is necessary. After the command is issued from the CPU to the mechanical system such as the stepping motor, the program frees the CPU and then starts a timer which will run for the previously mentioned predetermined time interval necessary to complete the command. At the end of this time, a signal from the timer directly to the CPU will interrupt the CPU and result in the resumption of control of the CPU.

To summarize, the program involves a real-time system in wh...