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Initial Changing of Time Constants in the Transient Analysis of Electrical Networks

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000075662D
Original Publication Date: 1971-Oct-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2005-Feb-24
Document File: 1 page(s) / 11K

Publishing Venue

IBM

Related People

Gaumann, G: AUTHOR [+2]

Abstract

Transient analysis of electrical networks normally starts from a certain quiescent point representing the steady state DC solution. A charging up of capacitors and/or inductors is simulated from zero or any given initial condition to the quiescent point. If the integration step size is adjusted to the time constants of the network, the steady state is reached after a minimum number of integration steps. However, independent of the integration method used, such a minimum number of steps normally cannot be found since the time constants in a general network differ greatly.

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Initial Changing of Time Constants in the Transient Analysis of Electrical Networks

Transient analysis of electrical networks normally starts from a certain quiescent point representing the steady state DC solution. A charging up of capacitors and/or inductors is simulated from zero or any given initial condition to the quiescent point. If the integration step size is adjusted to the time constants of the network, the steady state is reached after a minimum number of integration steps. However, independent of the integration method used, such a minimum number of steps normally cannot be found since the time constants in a general network differ greatly.

In order to reduce the number of integration steps and thus computing time, the values of the capacitors and/or inductors are changed temporarily so that all time constants in the circuit become approximately equal. This is achieved by comparing the charge-up currents of the capacitors and/or the charge up voltages of the inductors in two subsequent integration steps. The time constant of each particular capacitor and/or inductor is changed in accordance with the relative changes in the charge-up currents and/or charge-up voltages in two subsequent steps (relative changes of first derivatives). Based on these calculated time constants, the values of the capacitors and/or inductors can be set to be approximately equal for the subsequent solution step.

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