Browse Prior Art Database

Multiprocessing Pool

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000075685D
Original Publication Date: 1971-Oct-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2005-Feb-24
Document File: 2 page(s) / 15K

Publishing Venue

IBM

Related People

Ecker, ME: AUTHOR [+2]

Abstract

Batch chemical processing requires that each discrete process be performed in a separate container, with the parts transferred from bath to bath. Part masking for selective processing is generally accomplished by a photoresist method with other techniques such as taping or protective coating being employed on special applications.

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Multiprocessing Pool

Batch chemical processing requires that each discrete process be performed in a separate container, with the parts transferred from bath to bath. Part masking for selective processing is generally accomplished by a photoresist method with other techniques such as taping or protective coating being employed on special applications.

A number of chemical process combinations may be grouped in a common container employing compatible immiscible fluids as host mediums with inert barriers therebetween. The main requirements of the liquids and/or materials involved in a multiprocessing pool are that the liquids interfacing one another must be immiscible and the components present within any single layer. This is for the purpose of achieving a processing operation which must be either insoluble in the adjacent interfacing liquid, or if soluble, then the processing component must be rendered inert with respect to processing by that adjacent liquid.

The multiprocessing pool 10 shown in drawing A contains a suitable number of immiscible fluids N stacked vertically in a container 12. A glass observation port 14 with etched graduations 16 is provided for rough estimation and adjustment of the fluid phase interfaces 18. Since the processing phases are generally separated by inert barrier phases, a dye could be introduced in the barrier fluid so as to provide a desired contrast at the phase interface and thereby allow optical sensing and fine adjustment of the interface. The barrier phases, which are essentially nonprocessing stages in the system, may be utilized for insertion or extraction of the parts to be processed. The multiprocessing pool container 12 has a perimeter sealing device 20 for securing and sealing the cap assembly 22 to the container 12. The cap assembly 22 is fitted with temperature probes, pressure relief valves, gas expansion control and an extendable fiber optics interface sensing probe. The cap assembly 22 also contains the variable rate part positioning drive head 24. This device provides for the traversing of any and all stages of processing in the pool.

The parts are placed in a tray or holding fixture mounted on the end of a shaft, which forms part of the drive head, and are positioned in any phase of the system for any desired length of time.

The container 12 can have an array of part positioning head assemblies located on either the top, bottom or both top and bottom. This permits simultaneous processing of parts. The multiprocessing pool 10 is designed for N fluids with each fluid stage having an input circulation port 26 and a fluid output port 28.

Drawing B shows a simplified immiscible ternary control system. Each of the three immiscible fluids 1,2,3 has an independent flow valve 36, bleed valve 38 and replenish system 40 between its position in the container 12 and its supply reservoir 42. The adjacent immiscible fluids 1,2,3 are volumetrically coupled to one another by a double acting piston...