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Forming Delineated Oxide Patterns

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000075723D
Original Publication Date: 1971-Nov-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2005-Feb-24
Document File: 2 page(s) / 28K

Publishing Venue

IBM

Related People

Beyer, KD: AUTHOR [+3]

Abstract

This compound can be used to form lineated doped oxide patterns, masking coatings, cross-over areas, and the like. A preferred application is illustrated, wherein a glass coating doped with a suitable oxide 10 is formed on substrate 12 to the desired pattern. After depositing a suitable encapsulating coating 14, the resultant device is heated and the dopant in layer 10 diffuses downwardly into the semiconductor body 12 to form diffused regions.

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Forming Delineated Oxide Patterns

This compound can be used to form lineated doped oxide patterns, masking coatings, cross-over areas, and the like. A preferred application is illustrated, wherein a glass coating doped with a suitable oxide 10 is formed on substrate 12 to the desired pattern. After depositing a suitable encapsulating coating 14, the resultant device is heated and the dopant in layer 10 diffuses downwardly into the semiconductor body 12 to form diffused regions.

By this technique, both doped or undoped SiO(2) films can be deposited and formed without the use of conventional photolithographic techniques.

In this method a polysiloxane is combined with a light sensitive compound, as for example, peroxides such as bistriorgano silyl peroxides, organo peroxysilanes, or dialkyl peroxides, to form a compound which can be applied to the surface of a semiconductor. In the areas that are irradiated through a suitable mask, the peroxides decompose causing the cross-linking of the polysiloxanes. The areas that are not irradiated can be dissolved in a suitable organic solvent. Subsequent heat treatments in oxidizing ambients decompose the remaining polymerized siloxane to form SiO(2). A dopant compound can be added to the above-mentioned mixture to form the doped oxide.

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