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Low Inertia High Torque Printed Circuit Motor

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000075752D
Original Publication Date: 1971-Nov-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2005-Feb-24
Document File: 2 page(s) / 53K

Publishing Venue

IBM

Related People

Fisher, GA: AUTHOR [+3]

Abstract

Tubular printed circuit armature 1 is supported at one end by a plastic disc 2 having four thin-walled, radially extending arms 3 which connect the disc to motor shaft 4. The motor shaft is positioned in plastic end bell 5 by bearings 6 and 7 and by spring 8. The disc includes an optical mask 9 of an optical tachometer. The optical tachometer includes light source 10 and photocell 11. The end bell 5 also holds two 90 degrees paced brushes 12.

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Low Inertia High Torque Printed Circuit Motor

Tubular printed circuit armature 1 is supported at one end by a plastic disc 2 having four thin-walled, radially extending arms 3 which connect the disc to motor shaft 4. The motor shaft is positioned in plastic end bell 5 by bearings 6 and 7 and by spring 8. The disc includes an optical mask 9 of an optical tachometer. The optical tachometer includes light source 10 and photocell 11. The end bell 5 also holds two 90 degrees paced brushes 12.

The central housing of the motor is an open-ended magnetic material cylinder 13 and a central rod in the form of a four-pole magnet 14 whose poles are 90 degrees spaced.

A second plastic end bell 15 includes an internal, central located post 16 and a recessed annular well 17 which surrounds the post. When end bell 15 is molded, it is removed from the mold and while still hot it is slipped over the end of cylinder 13. When the end bell cools, it shrinks and is mounted on the end of the cylinder.

A washer of Bi-staged epoxy is placed in position on post 16. magnet 14 is then positioned with a cylindrical spacer, not shown, surrounding the magnet to define motor air gap 18. The magnet is mechanically held in place, by a bolt which extends through the central opening in the magnet and an opening in the end bell. The structure is then heated to cure the epoxy and mount the magnet on the end bell. After heating, the air gap spacer is removed. The magnet is now mechanically mounted, bot...