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Moving Lens Optics with Reflector Mirror Illumination

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000075756D
Original Publication Date: 1971-Nov-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2005-Feb-24
Document File: 2 page(s) / 41K

Publishing Venue

IBM

Related People

Miller, MJ: AUTHOR

Abstract

Typically, copier scanning systems with a moving lens 1 and moving illumination lamps 2, Fig. 1, require extra drive mechanisms to move the lamps across the original document plane 3. The lamps are required to move the full width of the document glass, while the lens moves only half this distance, which complicates the drive mechanism.

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Moving Lens Optics with Reflector Mirror Illumination

Typically, copier scanning systems with a moving lens 1 and moving illumination lamps 2, Fig. 1, require extra drive mechanisms to move the lamps across the original document plane 3. The lamps are required to move the full width of the document glass, while the lens moves only half this distance, which complicates the drive mechanism.

The mechanism of Fig. 2 eliminates the separate mechanical drive for the illumination system. A single, flat vertical mirror 4 is rigidly mounted on the moving carriage 5 with lens 6 so that it also moves only one half the document width. The mirror can be light-weight, since it need only reflect illumination light, and is not an image-carrying mirror. A fixed lamp 7 is mounted in an elliptical reflector 8, and is armed so that the light rays strike vertical mirror 4 and are reflected to the document glass 9, where they come to focus. The mirror motion is arranged so that the distance A-B-C remains constant, and the light remains in focus across the document width.

The relationship between vertical mirror 4 and lens 6 is such that the lens is always viewing the point on which the illumination is centered. This is accomplished by proper setting of the distance "l".

This system has the additional advantage that the lamp is not located near the document glass, and the mirror can reflect the light away from the operator's eyes. Use of a dichroic mirror eliminates the infrared radiat...