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Browse Prior Art Database

Keyboard Low Cost Low Profile Illuminated

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000075757D
Original Publication Date: 1971-Nov-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2005-Feb-24
Document File: 2 page(s) / 49K

Publishing Venue

IBM

Related People

Emig, MB: AUTHOR

Abstract

The keyboard construction offers a number of advantages. These include cost reduction; low profile permitting the keyboard to be incorporated into recording unit, thereby eliminating separate console; and design brings lamp closer to lens, permitting a lower current usage and reducing the adverse affect of extraneous light.

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Keyboard Low Cost Low Profile Illuminated

The keyboard construction offers a number of advantages. These include cost reduction; low profile permitting the keyboard to be incorporated into recording unit, thereby eliminating separate console; and design brings lamp closer to lens, permitting a lower current usage and reducing the adverse affect of extraneous light.

Spring 1, a beryllium copper stamping, raises keybutton 2 upwardly (at rest position). The two arms (a) and (b) also move upwardly as keybutton 2 is pressed downwardly so that arms (a) and (b) make contact with the bottom side of printed circuit board 3. Spring 1 is placed into holder 4, which is compressed so that the flanged area can be inserted through board 3 and expanded for permanent retention of holder 4.

Lamp 5 is inserted into 0-ring 6. This assembly is then inserted into holder 4 and its two-wire lead pulled between board 3 and flanges of holder 4. Pressure points are detailed in circle 7 showing electrical contact with circuitry on board 3.

Keybutton 2 having two flexible legs is then inserted into board 3. The ends of the two legs contact spring 1, and the two offsets limit its upward or rest position.

Depressing button 2 0.050" t, 0.070" causes the arms (a) and (b) to move in excess of twice the motion upwardly as the button is moved downwardly, thereby assuring contact with the circuit board and providing a wiping action.

One application includes a matrix configuration on the bottom of th...