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Machine Tool Contouring Route Algorithm

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000075803D
Original Publication Date: 1971-Nov-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2005-Feb-24
Document File: 2 page(s) / 44K

Publishing Venue

IBM

Related People

Beeman, JH: AUTHOR

Abstract

The algorithm illustrated in the above flow chart, provides a means for analyzing the calculations required for the computation of a machine tool line-circle contouring cut sequence in order to perform only those calculations which are necessary. A line-circle contouring cut sequence is defined as a tool motion in a known direction using a vertical tool axis, check and drive surfaces which are either vertical planes or vertical cylinders, and a part surface which is a nonvertical plane. The cutter geometry and location are considered known and the cutter is assumed to be within tolerance of the drive surface.

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Machine Tool Contouring Route Algorithm

The algorithm illustrated in the above flow chart, provides a means for analyzing the calculations required for the computation of a machine tool line- circle contouring cut sequence in order to perform only those calculations which are necessary. A line-circle contouring cut sequence is defined as a tool motion in a known direction using a vertical tool axis, check and drive surfaces which are either vertical planes or vertical cylinders, and a part surface which is a nonvertical plane. The cutter geometry and location are considered known and the cutter is assumed to be within tolerance of the drive surface. Such a calculation is currently performed by the IBM System/360 APT Numerical Control processor, by noting that such a cut sequence is along either a linear or a circular path and that the problem thus reduces to selecting an appropriate stopping point. The APT/360 processor computes all possible stopping points and then selects the correct point from this set of points by noting the user's specification of a TO, ON, PAST or TANTO stopping position, as well as the stopping point intersection number.

The algorithm uses the drive and check surface types as well as the specified TO, ON, PAST or TANTO stopping conditions to choose which points actually could be selected as stopping points and then computing only those points. This reordering of the testing sequence reduces the number of roots which must be computed, from as many as six to a maximum of two.

The flow chart depicts the basi...