Browse Prior Art Database

Producing Dense Metal Bonded Oxides

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000075841D
Original Publication Date: 1971-Nov-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2005-Feb-24
Document File: 1 page(s) / 12K

Publishing Venue

IBM

Related People

Rigby, EB: AUTHOR

Abstract

Metal bonded oxides are utilized where hard, long wearing materials are needed. One such composition is a fine grained homogeneous matrix of MgAl(2)O(4) and Mgo phase containing an evenly distributed metal phase. The metal phase may be Cu, Mo, Mn, Ag, Ni, Co, Fe, W, Cr, or preferably Ni-Mo or MnaMo alloys, and comprises 6 or less volume per cent of the phases present to retain the nonconductive nature of the ceramic. The coefficient of thermal expansion of the composition can be adjusted over a finite range, by controlling the ratio of the oxide components.

This text was extracted from a PDF file.
This is the abbreviated version, containing approximately 95% of the total text.

Page 1 of 1

Producing Dense Metal Bonded Oxides

Metal bonded oxides are utilized where hard, long wearing materials are needed. One such composition is a fine grained homogeneous matrix of MgAl(2)O(4) and Mgo phase containing an evenly distributed metal phase. The metal phase may be Cu, Mo, Mn, Ag, Ni, Co, Fe, W, Cr, or preferably Ni-Mo or MnaMo alloys, and comprises 6 or less volume per cent of the phases present to retain the nonconductive nature of the ceramic. The coefficient of thermal expansion of the composition can be adjusted over a finite range, by controlling the ratio of the oxide components.

The raw materials are of high purity with an average particle diameter of three microns or less. The metal bonded oxides may be prepared by either of two methods. In the first, the components are milled as simple oxides, carbonates or other compounds that readily form pure oxides during a subsequent heat treatment. The dried powder is calcined between 1000-1200 degrees C, then placed in a controlled atmosphere to reduce the metal forming oxide components to the metallic state. Next, the metal-oxide mixture is hot pressed in an inert, reducing or vacuum atmosphere, preferably between 1200- 1300 degrees C. The second method incorporates the direct milling of fine metal powders with the oxide powders. After a drying step, the powder is hot pressed under conditions similar to that of the first method.

Such oxides are useful as die materials, and as wearing surface parts in movin...