Browse Prior Art Database

Two Hot Step FET Process

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000075879D
Original Publication Date: 1971-Dec-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2005-Feb-24
Document File: 2 page(s) / 26K

Publishing Venue

IBM

Related People

Garnache, RR: AUTHOR [+2]

Abstract

This method allows the number of high-temperature process steps to be reduced to two in the manufacture of a self-aligned gate field-effect transistor SAGFET and further provides extremely clean semiconductor-gate oxide-gate interfaces. The method includes the following steps:

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Two Hot Step FET Process

This method allows the number of high-temperature process steps to be reduced to two in the manufacture of a self-aligned gate field-effect transistor SAGFET and further provides extremely clean semiconductor-gate oxide-gate interfaces. The method includes the following steps:

1) Loading suitable semiconductor wafers 10 into an epitaxial reactor and growing appropriately doped epitaxial layer 12 to a thickness of several microns utilizing, for example, H(2) reduction of SiCl(4).

2) Without reducing the temperature, growing thin oxide layer 14 by turning off SiCl(4) flow and turning on oxygen at a concentration of less than 4 percent.

3) Still maintaining temperature, purging the reactor with hydrogen.

4) After purging, growing Si(3)N(4) layer 16 from reactants such as NH(3) and SiH(4).

5) Thereafter, growing a polycrystalline semiconductor layer 18. At this point, the original wafer will be completely covered by each of layers 12, 14, 16 and 18.

6) Removing coated wafers from the epitaxial reactor and etching polycrystalline semiconductor layer 18, to define the desired gate areas.

7) Etching Si(3)N(4) layer 16 and oxide layer 14 to define source-drain areas.

8) Placing the partially completed wafer into a suitable reactor and growing an impurity doped pyrolytic oxide 20 to any desired thickness.

9) Increasing the temperature of the reactor to cause suitable drive-in to form source and drain regions 22. This drive-in step also dopes the p...