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Dielectric Coolant Pump

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000075926D
Original Publication Date: 1971-Dec-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2005-Feb-24
Document File: 2 page(s) / 49K

Publishing Venue

IBM

Related People

Gupta, OR: AUTHOR [+2]

Abstract

The commercially available pump, when pumping dielectric coolant, is operating at very low NPSH (net positive suction head) because it is operating close to the boiling point of the coolant. The pumps under such conditions tend to cavitate, which causes erosion of the impellers within the pump. A secondary impeller 1 is added to the main impeller shaft 2 of the pump 3 at the so-called eye of the pump. The figure shows the impeller vane arrangement which is designed for the maximum operating flow rate. The locating of the secondary impeller at the correct location, with respect to the main impeller, and with the right vane angles to give maximum operating flow rate, keeps the net positive suction head from dropping sufficiently low to cause cavitation with respect to the dielectric coolants being pumped.

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Dielectric Coolant Pump

The commercially available pump, when pumping dielectric coolant, is operating at very low NPSH (net positive suction head) because it is operating close to the boiling point of the coolant. The pumps under such conditions tend to cavitate, which causes erosion of the impellers within the pump. A secondary impeller 1 is added to the main impeller shaft 2 of the pump 3 at the so-called eye of the pump. The figure shows the impeller vane arrangement which is designed for the maximum operating flow rate. The locating of the secondary impeller at the correct location, with respect to the main impeller, and with the right vane angles to give maximum operating flow rate, keeps the net positive suction head from dropping sufficiently low to cause cavitation with respect to the dielectric coolants being pumped.

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