Browse Prior Art Database

Self Controlling Diverting Valve

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000075927D
Original Publication Date: 1971-Dec-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2005-Feb-24
Document File: 2 page(s) / 56K

Publishing Venue

IBM

Related People

Gupta, OR: AUTHOR

Abstract

This self-controlling diverting valve controls the chilled water flowrate supplied to a heat exchanger in a cooling system. The device is adjustable so that the operating point can be preset. The valve consists of a main body 1 which includes a hot water inlet 2, a cold water inlet 3 and a mixed water outlet 4. The valve includes a two cone flow controller 5 which is operated by a bellows 6. The bellows is supported by a stem 7 which is adjustable by a screw 8. In assembly, an O-ring seal 9 is introduced to prevent leakage around the shaft. A graduated scale 10 is provided so that the desired operating point can be preset. The bellows 6 is partially filled with a fluorocarbon liquid. Thus, the air space above the liquid within the bellows is occupied by an air-vapor mixture.

This text was extracted from a PDF file.
At least one non-text object (such as an image or picture) has been suppressed.
This is the abbreviated version, containing approximately 77% of the total text.

Page 1 of 2

Self Controlling Diverting Valve

This self-controlling diverting valve controls the chilled water flowrate supplied to a heat exchanger in a cooling system. The device is adjustable so that the operating point can be preset. The valve consists of a main body 1 which includes a hot water inlet 2, a cold water inlet 3 and a mixed water outlet
4. The valve includes a two cone flow controller 5 which is operated by a bellows
6. The bellows is supported by a stem 7 which is adjustable by a screw 8. In assembly, an O-ring seal 9 is introduced to prevent leakage around the shaft. A graduated scale 10 is provided so that the desired operating point can be preset. The bellows 6 is partially filled with a fluorocarbon liquid. Thus, the air space above the liquid within the bellows is occupied by an air-vapor mixture.

The water returning from the system heat exchanger, because of its higher temperature, causes the fluorocarbon liquid within the bellows to evaporate, thus expanding the bellows due to the increase in pressure therein. This tends to close off the lower cone in valve 3 so that less cold water is bypassed and accordingly, more cold water is supplied to the heat exchanger. Conversely, when the heat load is reduced partially or completely, the return fluid would be cooler and would cause the bellows to contract thereby opening the lower cone and increasing the bypassed flow of cold water. Another cone valve, not shown, operates in conjunction with the bypass valve...