Browse Prior Art Database

Buffered Multiplexer Adapter (Standard Data Adapter)

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000075931D
Original Publication Date: 1971-Dec-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2005-Feb-24
Document File: 2 page(s) / 33K

Publishing Venue

IBM

Related People

Vossman, RA: AUTHOR

Abstract

The figure illustrates a standard data adapter 1 which provides a low-cost means of supplying numeric type data from a centrally located, large data base processor, not shown, to controllers 10 of various types of process machines distributed around a production floor. The adapter buffers process information received via a high-speed synchronous input channel 3 and distributes this information to the machines via asynchronous low-speed channels 11. The adapter I is coupled to remote entry panels 2. Part number requests are made from digit switches, not shown, located on 2 and are routed to memory under control of the remote operator panel control logic 6. Panel 2 also contains a set of pushbuttons and indicators for use by the machine operators to control the system.

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Buffered Multiplexer Adapter (Standard Data Adapter)

The figure illustrates a standard data adapter 1 which provides a low-cost means of supplying numeric type data from a centrally located, large data base processor, not shown, to controllers 10 of various types of process machines distributed around a production floor. The adapter buffers process information received via a high-speed synchronous input channel 3 and distributes this information to the machines via asynchronous low-speed channels 11. The adapter I is coupled to remote entry panels 2. Part number requests are made from digit switches, not shown, located on 2 and are routed to memory under control of the remote operator panel control logic 6. Panel 2 also contains a set of pushbuttons and indicators for use by the machine operators to control the system. In response to requests from the operator panels, the required processor data is sent to the adapter and is deserialized, and separated from timing signals by the transmission control logic 4 and transferred into memory 5. The adapter, interrupt driven, provides direct hardware branching to the attached machines and is controlled in part by the multiplexer control logic 7. Logic 7 keeps track of which machine is asking for which data from memory. Special interface logic 8 is the only part of the system that is unique for each different machine type to be attached to the adapter. Its purpose is to match the signal characteristics of an attached mach...