Browse Prior Art Database

Wire Wrapping Stylus

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000075939D
Original Publication Date: 1971-Dec-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2005-Feb-24
Document File: 2 page(s) / 42K

Publishing Venue

IBM

Related People

Bajan, MM: AUTHOR [+2]

Abstract

In conventional wire wrapping machinery, a slot in a rotating mandrel is adapted for receiving a wire which is to be wrapped about, for example, a pin, the wire being retained in the slot due to the friction of an axially slideable sleeve circumscribing the mandrel and pressing the wire into the slot. In certain instances the wire to be used is extremely small in diameter and the slightest wear in the slot, due to the sliding friction of the wire, requires frequent tool replacement and is expensive.

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Wire Wrapping Stylus

In conventional wire wrapping machinery, a slot in a rotating mandrel is adapted for receiving a wire which is to be wrapped about, for example, a pin, the wire being retained in the slot due to the friction of an axially slideable sleeve circumscribing the mandrel and pressing the wire into the slot. In certain instances the wire to be used is extremely small in diameter and the slightest wear in the slot, due to the sliding friction of the wire, requires frequent tool replacement and is expensive.

To overcome these problems, a rotating mandrel 10 including an axially slideable sleeve 11 is provided. An aperture 12 is centrally located in the mandrel 10 for the receipt of a pin 13 to be wire wrapped. A groove 14, having an upwardly sloped lower wall 15, merges into a flat 16 and then into a groove extension 17. The groove 14 and groove extension 17 are spaced to form a peninsula 18 therebetween. The groove extension 17 terminates in a radially extending slot 19, which provides communication between the aperture 12 and the groove extension. As illustrated, the peninsula 18 has a leading end 20 which is undercut as at 22 to help retain the wire in the groove, and to capture the wire in a manner which will be explained hereinafter.

In operation, a wire 21 engages the flat 16 and relative motion between the wire and the mandrel effects engagement of the wire in the undercut portion 22 of the leading end 20 of the peninsula 18. Further relative m...