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Vibration and Stress Analysis

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000076008D
Original Publication Date: 1971-Dec-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2005-Feb-24
Document File: 1 page(s) / 11K

Publishing Venue

IBM

Related People

Licausi, N: AUTHOR [+2]

Abstract

A vibration and stress analysis (VASA) is obtained for flat plates which are simple supported, clamped, fixed or any combination of the above mounting arrangements and which may have variable thickness, weight and/or elastic modulus. The analysis is performed by sequentially calculating static deflections and then using these deflections in calculating natural frequency and stresses. The above calculations are made using the finite difference method.

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Vibration and Stress Analysis

A vibration and stress analysis (VASA) is obtained for flat plates which are simple supported, clamped, fixed or any combination of the above mounting arrangements and which may have variable thickness, weight and/or elastic modulus. The analysis is performed by sequentially calculating static deflections and then using these deflections in calculating natural frequency and stresses. The above calculations are made using the finite difference method.

The program uses a numerical approach, representing solid portions of the unit with a network of small equally dimensioned squares, called nodes. Two rows of nodes are also needed around the solid portion of the unit to aid in the calculations. In Part I of the program, deflections are calculated at each nodal point. In calculating the deflections, a relaxation technique is used which automatically determines problem solution. This technique usually converges rapidly, a typical problem requiring only a few minutes of computer time. In Part II, the natural frequency is calculated by equating maximum kinetic energy of a system resonating at its natural frequency and the maximum potential energy stored in the bending of a plate. These energies are calculated by using the deflections calculated in Part I. In Part III, the deflections calculated in Part I are used to calculate a normal stress and shear stress in the X and Y directions and a shear stress due to twist at each nodal point.

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