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Controllable Photoresist Pattern Profile

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000076022D
Original Publication Date: 1971-Dec-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2005-Feb-24
Document File: 2 page(s) / 41K

Publishing Venue

IBM

Related People

Greiner, JH: AUTHOR [+2]

Abstract

In photoprocessing technology, the profile of the photoresist pattern is often a major factor in determining the quality of subsequently deposited patterns. This is particularly true of the stencil technique where the material to be patterned is deposited onto a substrate covered with a photoresist pattern. In order to improve the profile, it is proposed to use a light-diffusing suspension in the photoresist material.

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Controllable Photoresist Pattern Profile

In photoprocessing technology, the profile of the photoresist pattern is often a major factor in determining the quality of subsequently deposited patterns. This is particularly true of the stencil technique where the material to be patterned is deposited onto a substrate covered with a photoresist pattern. In order to improve the profile, it is proposed to use a light-diffusing suspension in the photoresist material.

Fig. 1 shows a material 10 which is deposited onto a photoresist 12, previously deposited onto substrate 14. Removal of photoresist 12 leaves the desired pattern of material 10 on the substrate. The quality of the generated pattern depends on various parameters, such as the ratio of the photoresist thickness to the material deposit thickness, and the flatness and steepness of the photoresist edges. The best result and structures having highest resolution are obtained if the photoresist edges are undercut as shown in Fig. 2.

In order to obtain the undercutting desired, a controlled light-diffusing suspension is added to photoresist 12. During exposure of the photoresist, the suspension scatters the incoming light (Fig. 3). For instance, an undercut profile is shown in Fig. 3 where the profile is controlled by the particle size, index of refraction, and particle density of the suspension.

In Fig. 4, an alternative is shown in which the first layer 16 is comprised of photoresist having a suspension therein, whil...