Browse Prior Art Database

Linear Actuator

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000076030D
Original Publication Date: 1971-Dec-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2005-Feb-24
Document File: 2 page(s) / 64K

Publishing Venue

IBM

Related People

Abeernathy, RE: AUTHOR

Abstract

Described is a linear actuator suitable for use in transporting printing heads and the like. The actuator is low in cost, provides constant speed and is both clutchable and reversible. The device described develops significant thrust within modest dimensions and masses. In Fig. 1, a single or multiple threaded screw having square threads is supported by conventional means, not shown. It is driven at constant speed by any conventional means such as an AC motor. A speed is selected so that the threads translate at the desired linear velocity. The screw, nuts and sleeve are constructed of a ferric material so as to support the flux produced when the coil is energized.

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Linear Actuator

Described is a linear actuator suitable for use in transporting printing heads and the like. The actuator is low in cost, provides constant speed and is both clutchable and reversible.

The device described develops significant thrust within modest dimensions and masses. In Fig. 1, a single or multiple threaded screw having square threads is supported by conventional means, not shown. It is driven at constant speed by any conventional means such as an AC motor. A speed is selected so that the threads translate at the desired linear velocity. The screw, nuts and sleeve are constructed of a ferric material so as to support the flux produced when the coil is energized. The nuts are pressed or clamped into the sleeve on either side of the copper wire coil, which is wound on a bobbin of nonferrous material that provides, on its inside diameter, a bearing surface on which the carriage slides on the screw thread surface. The nuts are provided with matching threads; however, the nut threads do not mate with those of the screw and a nominal clearance is maintained between the thread top surfaces.

When the coil is energized, a torroidal flux is produced in the screw, nuts and sleeve surrounding the coil, thus causing magnetic interaction between the screw threads and the threads on the nuts. If the sleeve is prevented from rotating, by external means not shown in the drawing, the carriage will follow the linear translation of the screw threads in an axial di...