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Ink Resistant Type Carrier

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000076055D
Original Publication Date: 1972-Jan-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2005-Feb-24
Document File: 2 page(s) / 30K

Publishing Venue

IBM

Related People

Preiss, DM: AUTHOR [+2]

Abstract

A type slug carrying rubber belt which is ink and oil resistant and durable is illustrated in Fig. 1. It consists of a caprolactone base polyurethane rubber belt body 1 surrounding a filament wound restraint member 2. The belt is constructed by filament winding a steel stranded wire on a TEFLON* coated mandrel; the resulting wound wire sleeve, as illustrated in Fig. 2, is then primed with a phenolic-modified polyvinyl butyral primer, such as Conap 1146 and the primed wire is imbedded in unvulcanized polyurethane resin and partially vulcanized by heating to 230 degrees F for one hour. The polyurethane coated wire is then placed in a mold which is filled with castable polylactone polyurethane, such as Conap 3010/AH 31** and the liquid is cured 24 hours at 230 degrees F to produce the finished belt.

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Ink Resistant Type Carrier

A type slug carrying rubber belt which is ink and oil resistant and durable is illustrated in Fig. 1. It consists of a caprolactone base polyurethane rubber belt body 1 surrounding a filament wound restraint member 2. The belt is constructed by filament winding a steel stranded wire on a TEFLON* coated mandrel; the resulting wound wire sleeve, as illustrated in Fig. 2, is then primed with a phenolic-modified polyvinyl butyral primer, such as Conap 1146 and the primed wire is imbedded in unvulcanized polyurethane resin and partially vulcanized by heating to 230 degrees F for one hour. The polyurethane coated wire is then placed in a mold which is filled with castable polylactone polyurethane, such as Conap 3010/AH 31** and the liquid is cured 24 hours at 230 degrees F to produce the finished belt.

The rubber belt thus produced operates without adverse effect in the presence of 10w-40 motor oil and a variety of ribbon inks, which contain powerful solvents that attack most other belts. (Nitrile-butadiene rubber, neoprene, polyester polyurethane, and polyether polyurethane are all oil resistant but are attacked by the inks which contain such solvents as oleic acids, methoxyloeate, etc.) A wide range of concentrations for the caprolactone base material is possible, but best results under exposure to the above solvents is obtained when the caprolactone makes up at least 50% of the rubber composition. * Trademark of E. I. du Pont de Nemours &...