Browse Prior Art Database

International Keyboard Assistant

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000076071D
Original Publication Date: 2005-Feb-24
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2005-Feb-24
Document File: 1 page(s) / 22K

Publishing Venue

IBM

Abstract

This article addresses the usage of virtual keyboard mappings in combination with a real keyboard. It is suggested to allow foreign keyboards to be selected with a popup window showing a keyboard diagram of the virtual keyboard mapping, labelled with the foreign keys. Optionally, the keys of the keyboard diagram may be labelled to show both the actual character appearing on the physical keyboard and the foreign character currently generated by that key. Alternatively, using the mouse to directly type on the graphic keyboard can be envisaged.

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International Keyboard Assistant

Assume that a Spanish speaker who lives in Germany, and normally uses a German keyboard, wants to send an e-mail home. With a usual desktop environment, the user could set the computer keyboard to use a temporary Spanish mapping, but for this the user must learn which keys are different. Alternatively, all special keys can individually be entered as ASCII codes or selected from a set of special characters for cut/paste via the clipboard. Assume that a native French speaker with some knowledge of Greek is transcribing text from an instruction manual written in Greek to be e-mailed to a colleague for translation. This person has no idea what a normal Greek keyboard looks like.

It is suggested to allow foreign keyboards to be selected with a popup window showing a keyboard diagram, labelled with the foreign keys. Optionally, the keys may be labelled to show both the actual character appearing on the physical keyboard and the foreign character currently generated by that key. For a touch typist using a slightly different keyboard mostly for accented characters this would be enough to prompt the quick finding of the new keys. Alternatively, for a person completely unfamiliar with the foreign keyboard, hunt-and-peck should be possible to directly use the mouse to type on the graphic keyboard.

The second alternative has the new problem of identifying the destination window for the typing. Since mouse activity in the window frequently ide...