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Browse Prior Art Database

High Density Information Recording by Vaporization of Film Areas

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000076110D
Original Publication Date: 1972-Jan-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2005-Feb-24
Document File: 2 page(s) / 37K

Publishing Venue

IBM

Related People

Greenblott, BJ: AUTHOR

Abstract

When opaque plastic film 1 carried on reflective support substrate 2 (e.g. metallic) is transported as suggested at 3 and selectively vaporized in binary spot or interference patterns (e.g. by laser energy 4, Fig. 1), a high-density high-contrast information recording is created without intervening chemical or electrical treatment of the film. The information may be reproduced electrically (Fig. 2) by illumination and photodetection methods; e.g. by transmission of light L through slit 6 in opaque mask 7, and selective reflection of light from support stratum 2 to photocell(s) PC at areas underlying evaporated portions of the film 1.

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High Density Information Recording by Vaporization of Film Areas

When opaque plastic film 1 carried on reflective support substrate 2 (e.g. metallic) is transported as suggested at 3 and selectively vaporized in binary spot or interference patterns (e.g. by laser energy 4, Fig. 1), a high-density high- contrast information recording is created without intervening chemical or electrical treatment of the film. The information may be reproduced electrically (Fig. 2) by illumination and photodetection methods; e.g. by transmission of light L through slit 6 in opaque mask 7, and selective reflection of light from support stratum 2 to photocell(s) PC at areas underlying evaporated portions of the film
1.

An intervening translucent film (e.g. clear plastic 8, Fig. 3) is useful to protect the base 2 from the recording energy.

When the base contains an electroluminescent surface 12 (Fig. 4), reproduction photocells may sense the source emissions of the base to effect simplified reproduction of the recorded data.

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