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Fabricating Hermetic Seals

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000076278D
Original Publication Date: 1972-Feb-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2005-Feb-24
Document File: 2 page(s) / 44K

Publishing Venue

IBM

Related People

Shapiro, JB: AUTHOR

Abstract

This technique permits the fabrication of hermetic seals by use of metal vapor deposition techniques, and is applicable to glass, ceramic and metal hermetic seals. The procedure may be utilized for perimeter seals, for pin seals, and for attaching a variety of structures, such as solder cups, to the surface of the glass, ceramic, or metal, as shown in Fig. 1.

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Fabricating Hermetic Seals

This technique permits the fabrication of hermetic seals by use of metal vapor deposition techniques, and is applicable to glass, ceramic and metal hermetic seals. The procedure may be utilized for perimeter seals, for pin seals, and for attaching a variety of structures, such as solder cups, to the surface of the glass, ceramic, or metal, as shown in Fig. 1.

Typically, a layer of chromium 2, 250-2500 angstroms thick is vapor deposited on the surface 1 to be sealed. This is followed by vapor depositing a layer of copper 3, 2000 angstroms to 20,000 angstroms thick. Additional copper may be plated on this surface. A layer of noble metal 4, 250 angstroms-2500 angstroms thick, is then vapor deposited. Alternately, nickel may be substituted for the copper or the noble metal eliminated.

Standard masking and/or photoresist techniques are utilized to develop the desired metallized pattern. Various structures, such as ring frames 5, pins 6 and cups 7, may then be brazed to the upper surface of the deposited metallization by use of appropriate brazing materials 8, which may range from soft solders to hard brazes.

Nonplanar surfaces, as in Fig. 2 and Fig. 3, are readily metallized at 10 by this technique. Metal structures 11 may then be brazed to these surfaces. Even recessed surfaces 12, as shown in Fig. 4, may be metallized by appropriate masking.

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