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Identifying Sources of Contaminants

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000076292D
Original Publication Date: 1972-Feb-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2005-Feb-24
Document File: 1 page(s) / 11K

Publishing Venue

IBM

Related People

Marchese, MA: AUTHOR [+3]

Abstract

Sources of contaminants from record media are detected by the use of tagging material. For example, a fluorescent material is applied to selected surface portions of a magnetic recording tape. The recording media is then used in a tape transport system. Subsequent inspection of the transport under ultraviolet light, indicates points of tape abrasion and debris accumulation within the system. A photographic record of the fluorescent material-can be preserved. It also shows the distribution pattern of debris from the tape.

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Identifying Sources of Contaminants

Sources of contaminants from record media are detected by the use of tagging material. For example, a fluorescent material is applied to selected surface portions of a magnetic recording tape. The recording media is then used in a tape transport system. Subsequent inspection of the transport under ultraviolet light, indicates points of tape abrasion and debris accumulation within the system. A photographic record of the fluorescent material-can be preserved. It also shows the distribution pattern of debris from the tape.

The tagging material is preferably stable and strongly fluorescent. Useful fluorescent materials include coumarins substituted in the 7 position as, for example, 7-diethylamino-4-methylcoumarin. The tagging material can be dissolved in a solvent as, for example, a 1% alcohol solution, and then coated on the media. Solvents which are capable of resolving the media can also be used. As another alternative, the fluorescent material can be included in the original media system.

This technique is especially useful in evaluating recording head and media interaction. Heads are especially susceptible to wear and malfunction due to contamination from media. By determining the source of debris, engineering steps to modify the head or the media can be taken.

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