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Wire Ability Analysis for Printed Circuits

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000076309D
Original Publication Date: 1972-Feb-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2005-Feb-24
Document File: 3 page(s) / 27K

Publishing Venue

IBM

Related People

Fitch, AE: AUTHOR [+2]

Abstract

This matrix calculation technique is useful for evaluating the ability of a given surface configuration to support printed circuit interconnection wiring between specified point sets. A simple example is illustrated for a square 5 x 5 array of connection points. It is assumed that lettered point-pairs A-A, B-B, C-C are to be interconnected, that each connecting wire must be placed within the space bounded by the peripheral 14 points of the array, and that each connecting lead must lie within one row of the rectangle determined by the end points. The last assumption requires for instance that the connection between A-A lies within the shaded rectangle area.

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Wire Ability Analysis for Printed Circuits

This matrix calculation technique is useful for evaluating the ability of a given surface configuration to support printed circuit interconnection wiring between specified point sets. A simple example is illustrated for a square 5 x 5 array of connection points. It is assumed that lettered point-pairs A-A, B-B, C-C are to be interconnected, that each connecting wire must be placed within the space bounded by the peripheral 14 points of the array, and that each connecting lead must lie within one row of the rectangle determined by the end points. The last assumption requires for instance that the connection between A-A lies within the shaded rectangle area.

Spaces for lead placement between consecutive vertical rows of points of the point set are designated vertical channels (VC1, VC2, VC3 and VC4 proceeding from left to right). Horizontal wiring channel spaces likewise are designated HC1, HC2, HC3, HC4 from top to bottom. The vertical numerical demand array is formed as follows; at successive horizontal cuts the vertical channel demand of each connecting lead is calculated:

(Image Omitted)

These demand values for each connecting lead are summed to yield, for the cut illustrated, the second row of the Vertical Demand Array. Similar calculations for successive "cuts" are made to obtain the entire Vertical Demand Array A(V) shown below: 1/3 1/3 1/3 0 7/12 7/12 7/12 1 1/4 A(V) = 7/12 7/12 7/12 1 1/4 1/4 1/4 1/4 1 1/4.

The horizontal array A(H), formed similarly by calculating contribution probabilities in HC1-HC4, is: 7/12...