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Linear Stacker Control Circuit for High Speed Printers

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000076389D
Original Publication Date: 1972-Feb-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2005-Feb-24
Document File: 3 page(s) / 55K

Publishing Venue

IBM

Related People

Loesch, MD: AUTHOR [+2]

Abstract

This circuit which provides a variable delay is used to control the stacker assembly in high-speed printers. The amount the stacker assembly moves is dependent upon the number of parts to the form and must be adjusted for different part forms.

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Linear Stacker Control Circuit for High Speed Printers

This circuit which provides a variable delay is used to control the stacker assembly in high-speed printers. The amount the stacker assembly moves is dependent upon the number of parts to the form and must be adjusted for different part forms.

Single-shot 1 drives the circuit which controls the relay R-1. The relay completes the circuit to motor 2 which is connected to worm gear 3 on which a portion of the stacker assembly 4 rides. The stacker rises as the worm gear turns and the amount of rise is determined by the delay of the circuit. The single- shot fires for each eighth sheet of form through the printer.

With an uplevel initially present at the input, T1 is on, T2 is off and C1 is charged to a level which assurers T4 being on and T5 being off. When T5 is off, T6 and T7 are off giving an uplevel at the output. A switch to the downlevel at the input brings the base of T1 down, turning T1 off and T2 on. T2 in the on condition discharges C1, turning T4 off, and T5, T6, T7 on, bringing the output to a downlevel. After C1 has discharged and the downlevel remains at the input, T2 remains on, pulling current from the current source T3, which is always biased on by the divider action of R1, D1, and R2. C1 cannot charge therefore when the input is at the downlevel.

When the signal at the input switches back to an uplevel, T1 turns on, T2 turns off and C1 begins charging towards +6 V. T4 remains off and T5, T6, T7 remain on. When the voltage on C1 and, therefore, the base of T4 reaches that on the base of T5, T4 turns on and T5 turns off. T6 and T7 turn off and the output switches to an uplevel.

Resistors R3 and R4 and t...