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Interrupt Servicing Subroutine

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000076412D
Original Publication Date: 1972-Feb-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2005-Feb-24
Document File: 2 page(s) / 14K

Publishing Venue

IBM

Related People

Carson, RR: AUTHOR [+3]

Abstract

In order to maximize machine utilization on a production line and schedule the machines for various manufacturing processes, it is essential that some information be obtained as to the machine's history relative to downtime. Additionally, such downtime, if properly analyzed as to cause, may result in a modification in the processing machine to increase the machine's production time while reducing downtime. The subroutine described below permits the utilization of an IBM Type 1800 computer for monitoring the various machines on a production line to determine both duration of downtime, and the cause thereof.

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Interrupt Servicing Subroutine

In order to maximize machine utilization on a production line and schedule the machines for various manufacturing processes, it is essential that some information be obtained as to the machine's history relative to downtime. Additionally, such downtime, if properly analyzed as to cause, may result in a modification in the processing machine to increase the machine's production time while reducing downtime. The subroutine described below permits the utilization of an IBM Type 1800 computer for monitoring the various machines on a production line to determine both duration of downtime, and the cause thereof. For this purpose, the various stop devices on a machine may be connected through a process equipment sensor base computer interface to the computer, to give a direct recording of the time the machine is down and a recordation of the cause of the machine downtime.

An IBM 1800 computer interrupt servicing subroutine (ISS) (a software routine that (1) manipulates and transfers data from a given input/output device and (2) services all interrupts for that device after they are detected) has been programmed to accept input from a process equipment/sensor based computer interface.

The output of the interface (i.e. the computer input) is twelve lines for each piece of equipment being monitored: eight carrying a binary-coded event (values from 0 to 255) and one of the remaining four being activated to cause a unique interrupt, indicating that a start, stop error (event) or completed part has occurred on the process. If an error has occurred, the eight lines of binary coded information must be investigated to further define the problem. To the interrupt servicing subroutine all event codes look the same (binary number of 0-255), but application programs investigating these codes later will be able to correlate them with specific events such as NO PARTS, or SHIFT START, for example.

The eight information lines are physically input to the computer in half of a digital input contact word. When the word is "read" by the computer it will see a "1" or a "0" for each line, depending on whether or grams investigating these codes later will be able to correlate them with specific events such as NO PARTS, or SHIFT START, for example.

The eight information lines are physically input to the computer in half of a digital input contact word. When the word is "read" by the computer it will see a "1" or a "0" for each line, depending on whether or not a...