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Electroplating of Metal Studs

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000076437D
Original Publication Date: 1972-Mar-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2005-Feb-24
Document File: 2 page(s) / 45K

Publishing Venue

IBM

Related People

Schmeckenbecher, AF: AUTHOR

Abstract

The present arrangement insures controlled height electroplating, for example, the electroplating of metal studs on a ceramic substrate. An insulating fixture 10, having a plurality of cavities defined by the vertical sidewalls and being closed at the top and open on the bottom, is loosely placed on the top of an insulating substrate 12. Each cavity covers one or more of the several holes 14 which are to be plated. A plurality of insoluble anodes 16 extend down to a predetermined level into each of the cavities and the aqueous plating solution 18 contained therein. The anodes 16 can be formed of any suitable material, such as platinum or graphite. A cathode 19 supporting the substrate 10 completes the electroplating apparatus.

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Electroplating of Metal Studs

The present arrangement insures controlled height electroplating, for example, the electroplating of metal studs on a ceramic substrate. An insulating fixture 10, having a plurality of cavities defined by the vertical sidewalls and being closed at the top and open on the bottom, is loosely placed on the top of an insulating substrate 12. Each cavity covers one or more of the several holes 14 which are to be plated. A plurality of insoluble anodes 16 extend down to a predetermined level into each of the cavities and the aqueous plating solution 18 contained therein. The anodes 16 can be formed of any suitable material, such as platinum or graphite. A cathode 19 supporting the substrate 10 completes the electroplating apparatus.

When plating, the cavity is filled with an aqueous solution 18 and during the actual plating operation oxygen is developed at the anode. The oxygen gas collects on the top of the cavity and exerts a pressure so as to push the plating solution downwardly. When the upper level of the aqueous solution drops below the lower portion of the anode 16 associated with its particular cavity, the plating operation of the studs shown at 20 is terminated. Although this plating structure somewhat interferes with the usual agitation provided by a plating stirrer, sufficient agitation is provided in the cavities by the oxygen bubbles and by the density gradient of the plating solution in the cavities, due to the depletion and ...