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Liquid Crystal Display with Long Life

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000076525D
Original Publication Date: 1972-Mar-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2005-Feb-24
Document File: 2 page(s) / 35K

Publishing Venue

IBM

Related People

Kazan, B: AUTHOR

Abstract

One of the major problems with liquid crystal display devices is the limited life of the liquid crystal material. In typical liquid crystal display devices, the liquid crystal film is about 0.5-1.0 mil thick. In operation, when a voltage is applied between one of the transparent conducting segments and the opposing reflecting conductive surface, the liquid crystal therebetween changes its state from clear to milky. As a result of the flow of current, the liquid crystal material gradually deteriorates.

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Liquid Crystal Display with Long Life

One of the major problems with liquid crystal display devices is the limited life of the liquid crystal material. In typical liquid crystal display devices, the liquid crystal film is about 0.5-1.0 mil thick. In operation, when a voltage is applied between one of the transparent conducting segments and the opposing reflecting conductive surface, the liquid crystal therebetween changes its state from clear to milky. As a result of the flow of current, the liquid crystal material gradually deteriorates.

To produce a display device with long life, it is proposed that an arrangement be employed whereby a large amount of liquid crystal material will be available. Thus, the chamber having an inner dimension much greater than those conventionally employed, may be fabricated. As shown in the figure, a chamber may be fabricated by separating a pair of glass plates 1 and 3, by a pair of large spacers 5 and 7, which may be 100 mils thick, for example. The volume of liquid crystal material which may be sealed in such an arrangement is of the order of 100 times greater than that typically employed in conventional arrangements. Conductive plate 9 with a reflective surface is held close to glass viewing surface 3 by a pair of springs 11 and 13. Plate 9 is spaced from transparent conducting segments 15, 17 and 19 by a number of separate insulating elements, such as 21 and 23, spaced apart from each other along the edge of plate 9. The insula...