Browse Prior Art Database

Computer Aided Test of Sensor Based Systems

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000076545D
Original Publication Date: 1972-Mar-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2005-Feb-24
Document File: 2 page(s) / 39K

Publishing Venue

IBM

Related People

Fasciano, NT: AUTHOR [+3]

Abstract

Described is test equipment which can provide a realistic test environment for sensor-based data-processing systems. The equipment can simulate the inputs expected to be received by the processor and can analyze the responses expected for such inputs. In the drawing, the test equipment comprises a conventional processor 1, having a card reader 2 to supply program and control data to the processor 1 and a recorder 3 on which can be presented the test results. The processor 1 is connected over a set of lines 4 to a digital interface 5. Interface 5 has sufficient latched circuits to accept up to 256 digital signals from a system 6 under test and to supply 256 data signals and several interrupt signals to system 6.

This text was extracted from a PDF file.
At least one non-text object (such as an image or picture) has been suppressed.
This is the abbreviated version, containing approximately 70% of the total text.

Page 1 of 2

Computer Aided Test of Sensor Based Systems

Described is test equipment which can provide a realistic test environment for sensor-based data-processing systems. The equipment can simulate the inputs expected to be received by the processor and can analyze the responses expected for such inputs. In the drawing, the test equipment comprises a conventional processor 1, having a card reader 2 to supply program and control data to the processor 1 and a recorder 3 on which can be presented the test results. The processor 1 is connected over a set of lines 4 to a digital interface 5. Interface 5 has sufficient latched circuits to accept up to 256 digital signals from a system 6 under test and to supply 256 data signals and several interrupt signals to system 6. In addition, processor 1 is connected by lines 7 to an instrument interface 8, which can be selectively set to receive up to 32 analog signals for conversion to processor data or can supply seven selectively settable analog signals to system 6. The instrument interface can also provide level converters, clock signals and other useful indications, as well as being settable manually to provide a number of fixed inputs.

Control cards are provided to the reader 2 to enable the processor 1, with the interfaces 5 and 8, to simulate the equipment which will be connected to the system 6. The cards can inform the processor 1 of the variables to be set for the system 6 together with their duration and range, the response t...