Browse Prior Art Database

Measurement of Small Angles

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000076581D
Original Publication Date: 1972-Mar-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2005-Feb-24
Document File: 2 page(s) / 24K

Publishing Venue

IBM

Related People

Kratzert, RJ: AUTHOR [+2]

Abstract

This system provides for precisely measuring small angles. As illustrated, a small magnetic body 10 has an aperture 11 that is perpendicularly disposed to the longitudinal axis of body 10. In order to align an element parallel to the aperture, the location of the aperture must be precisely determined. Parallelism can be achieved by attaching a wire probe 12 perpendicularly across the aperture, with its terminals connected through an amplifier 13 to an indicator 14. An end of the body, having a coil 15 wound therearound, is energized by source 16 with an alternating voltage of the appropriate magnitude and frequency, thus setting up a magnetic field in the body.

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Measurement of Small Angles

This system provides for precisely measuring small angles.

As illustrated, a small magnetic body 10 has an aperture 11 that is perpendicularly disposed to the longitudinal axis of body 10. In order to align an element parallel to the aperture, the location of the aperture must be precisely determined. Parallelism can be achieved by attaching a wire probe 12 perpendicularly across the aperture, with its terminals connected through an amplifier 13 to an indicator 14. An end of the body, having a coil 15 wound therearound, is energized by source 16 with an alternating voltage of the appropriate magnitude and frequency, thus setting up a magnetic field in the body. The signal transformed from source 16 to indicator 14, is representative of the sine of the angle between probe 12 and the primary magnetic field extending longitudinally through the body 10. Upon appropriate calibration, the indicated signal can be interpreted as to its deviation from perpendicularity.

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