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Producing Microscopic Patterns on Chalcogenide Films

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000076584D
Original Publication Date: 1972-Mar-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2005-Feb-24
Document File: 2 page(s) / 13K

Publishing Venue

IBM

Related People

Ast, D: AUTHOR [+3]

Abstract

Microscopic circuit fabrication requires masking techniques capable of finely defining areas for depositions, diffusions, connections, etchings, etc. The present method provides a microscopic pattern definition. Other applications of the method are possible in the printing and photographic arts.

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Producing Microscopic Patterns on Chalcogenide Films

Microscopic circuit fabrication requires masking techniques capable of finely defining areas for depositions, diffusions, connections, etchings, etc. The present method provides a microscopic pattern definition. Other applications of the method are possible in the printing and photographic arts.

This method consists of a technique for obtaining patterns in chalcogenide films. The patterns are delineated by light or electron-beam writing and are developed as permanent openings in a film by an annealing and etching technique. The film with its pattern may be used as a mask, either directly on the surface of a wafer or on a separate holder such as a glass plate. The film with its pattern may also be useful in either conventional or xerographic printing techniques. The method for obtaining microscopic patterns in chalcogenide films is as follows:

An amorphous chalcogenide film (e.g., ternary mixtures of As, Te and Ce) is deposited on a suitable, cooled substrate by standard techniques of evaporation or sputtering. A laser (e.g., a He-Ne laser operating at 6328 Angstroms) is focused through a microscope objective onto the film in a small spot. Either the film and/or the beam are moved to. define the pattern to be etched. At a sufficient power level of the laser, a drastic change in the appearance of the exposed film sets in. At this point a change is visible in the pattern defining regions of the film. The written pattern is much more reflecting and much less transparent than the unwritten amorphous film. The film is then heated, until the visible contrast between the written and unwritten portions of the fil...