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Inductive Heating of Fluids

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000076606D
Original Publication Date: 1972-Mar-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2005-Feb-24
Document File: 2 page(s) / 32K

Publishing Venue

IBM

Related People

Jablonski, RB: AUTHOR

Abstract

An induction coil (Fig. 1) wrapped around a conduit 2 that is noninductive (or somewhat inductive) is employed to inductively heat a porous permeable member 3, to effect heating of a fluid as it flows through the pores of the member. The porous structure of member 3 provides extensive surface area for efficient thermal transfer. The magnitude of energy input to the coil will depend upon the preselected pore size, the surface area and volume of member 3, and the degree to and rate at which the fluid is to be heated and its flow rate.

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Inductive Heating of Fluids

An induction coil (Fig. 1) wrapped around a conduit 2 that is noninductive (or somewhat inductive) is employed to inductively heat a porous permeable member 3, to effect heating of a fluid as it flows through the pores of the member. The porous structure of member 3 provides extensive surface area for efficient thermal transfer. The magnitude of energy input to the coil will depend upon the preselected pore size, the surface area and volume of member 3, and the degree to and rate at which the fluid is to be heated and its flow rate.

Alternatively, porous member 3 may be replaced by a plurality of microscopic or macroscopic particles 4 (Fig. 2), suitably retained in a preselected zone 5 of the conduit 2 and inductively heatable by coil 1. The size, shape, specific gravity, etc., of these particles are selected so as to provide efficient heat transfer characteristics, and also to allow the particles to remain in a state of suspension and separation from the conduit and each other within zone 5. Thermal transfer from the particles to the fluid may be indirect; e.g., from particles which are heated by internal hysteresis loss within each particle and resultant conversion to heat energy, or by the macroscopic physical hysteresis losses associated with changes in orientation, motion and/or collision of the particles. Centrifugal, gravitational, mechanical or magnetic forces may be used to maintain the particles separated from the fluid strea...