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Browse Prior Art Database

Surface Hardening of Titanium With RF Sputtered Carbides

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000076610D
Original Publication Date: 1972-Mar-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2005-Feb-24
Document File: 1 page(s) / 11K

Publishing Venue

IBM

Related People

Griest, AJ: AUTHOR

Abstract

Described is a method for providing titanium and titanium alloy articles and parts with a superior wear-resistant, nongalling surface of titanium carbide or other hard wear-resistant phase material by RF sputtering.

This text was extracted from a PDF file.
This is the abbreviated version, containing approximately 98% of the total text.

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Surface Hardening of Titanium With RF Sputtered Carbides

Described is a method for providing titanium and titanium alloy articles and parts with a superior wear-resistant, nongalling surface of titanium carbide or other hard wear-resistant phase material by RF sputtering.

The method is practiced by placing the part or parts to be coated in an RF sputtering system and electrically connecting these parts to the anode of the system so that the surface of the parts to be coated is exposed to a plasma, which interacts with a cathodic target compounded of the materials to be sputtered. Preferred materials are titanium carbide, tungsten carbide or other such refractory materials or mixtures thereof. Conventional sputtering technology as regards the parameter of pressure, inert-gas type, RF power density, background impurities, etc., is adequate to deposit the required layers of hardened material in stoichiometrically correct proportions, and with near theoretical density and hardness. In typical sputtering operations, the inert gas would be argon at a pressure of 1 to 10 microns with an RF power density of 5 to 15 watts per square inch, at a frequency of 13.56 megacycles.

This process can be performed with the article being coated being maintained at a very low temperature, thus avoiding undesirable changes in the base material. Moreover, extremely thin layers can be deposited in stoichiometrically exact proportions, thus obtaining highly adherent surfaces with maximum...