Browse Prior Art Database

Large Area Raster Scanner with Laser and Three Beam Deflectors

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000076647D
Original Publication Date: 1972-Apr-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2005-Feb-24
Document File: 2 page(s) / 36K

Publishing Venue

IBM

Related People

Bartz, MR: AUTHOR [+3]

Abstract

The rapid and precise scanning of a laser beam over a large area in a complicated pattern, is made difficult by the fact that conventional laser-beam deflectors operate efficiently in only one coordinate axis.

This text was extracted from a PDF file.
At least one non-text object (such as an image or picture) has been suppressed.
This is the abbreviated version, containing approximately 81% of the total text.

Page 1 of 2

Large Area Raster Scanner with Laser and Three Beam Deflectors

The rapid and precise scanning of a laser beam over a large area in a complicated pattern, is made difficult by the fact that conventional laser-beam deflectors operate efficiently in only one coordinate axis.

Scanner 10 executes a small vertical-raster scan over any predetermined areas on large document 11, using three separate unidirectional beam deflectors 12, 13, 14. Fixed-position beam 15 from laser 16 enters continuously-operating, small-angle deflector 12, which converts it to a vertical raster 17 sweeping in the direction of arrow 18. Raster 17 may be about 0.4 inch high, sufficient to cover a single character on document 11. Deflector 12 may be either a mechanical or an electrooptical deflector. Deflector 13 sweeps raster 17 in the direction of arrow 19, to cover the entire width of document 11; this deflector is shown as an oscillating mirror. In order to scan different character lines on document 11 without moving it, deflector 14 receives the doubly-deflected beam 20, and sweeps it in the direction of arrow 21, in response to a control signal. Triply- deflected beam 22 is then capable of producing a small raster over the entire length and width of document 11 without moving the document. Deflector 14 is preferably a digitally-controlled electrooptical deflector, so that the small raster may be indexed to random locations along the document length, to scan character lines in any desired ord...