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Membrane Contact Array with Photosensitive Interconnections

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000076768D
Original Publication Date: 1972-Apr-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2005-Feb-24
Document File: 2 page(s) / 43K

Publishing Venue

IBM

Related People

Senger, RC: AUTHOR [+2]

Abstract

This device is used for functional testing of printed-circuit boards and has the capability of accommodating grids as small as printed-circuit techniques will allow. As shown, the device comprises a thin flexible membrane 1 of a suitable insulating material, such as MYLAR*, epoxy-glass, etc., which is forced into contact with the part 2 to be tested. Air pressure, for example, could be used as a forcing means. The membrane carries plated-through holes 3 in a pattern to contact the desired points 4 on the test piece. On top of the membrane, two sets of electrically common parallel conductors 5 and 6 are wired to a test instrument, such as an ohmmeter 7. Two conductors, one from each set, are connected to each plated-through hole with photoconductive material 8.

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Membrane Contact Array with Photosensitive Interconnections

This device is used for functional testing of printed-circuit boards and has the capability of accommodating grids as small as printed-circuit techniques will allow. As shown, the device comprises a thin flexible membrane 1 of a suitable insulating material, such as MYLAR*, epoxy-glass, etc., which is forced into contact with the part 2 to be tested. Air pressure, for example, could be used as a forcing means. The membrane carries plated-through holes 3 in a pattern to contact the desired points 4 on the test piece. On top of the membrane, two sets of electrically common parallel conductors 5 and 6 are wired to a test instrument, such as an ohmmeter 7. Two conductors, one from each set, are connected to each plated-through hole with photoconductive material 8. When two spots of light 9 are programmed to illuminate the photoconductive material at two separate holes, the ohmmeter will indicate the resistance of any circuit 10 between these two holes on the tested part.

Comparison of the ohmmeter indication with the value known for a good part completes the test of the two points. The ohmmeter measures point-to-point resistance which suffices for both a shorts and continuity test. The device is versatile, inexpensive and can be constructed with existing printed-circuit equipment. Other advantages are that it simultaneously contacts all test points and it can operate at high speed, since photoconductors resp...