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Formation of Embedded Components in Semiconductors during Molecular Beam Evaporation

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000076791D
Original Publication Date: 1972-Apr-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2005-Feb-24
Document File: 2 page(s) / 45K

Publishing Venue

IBM

Related People

Chang, LL: AUTHOR [+2]

Abstract

Fig. 1 shows the components of a molecular beam evaporation apparatus being utilized to simultaneously deposit a semiconductor and a dopant onto a substrate, to form embedded components in the semiconductor. Substrate 1 may be made of a single crystal semiconductor material or any other material, which permits the formation of single-crystal semiconductor layers on the surface thereof. Side ovens 2 are evaporant sources of Pi type semiconductor material which is heated to continuously evaporate onto substrate 1, resulting in growth along the Z-direction. Two side ovens 2 are shown in Fig. 1, though more can be used for better uniformity and faster growth rate. An N-type dopant is evaporated from center oven 3 through holed guiding mask 4.

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Formation of Embedded Components in Semiconductors during Molecular Beam Evaporation

Fig. 1 shows the components of a molecular beam evaporation apparatus being utilized to simultaneously deposit a semiconductor and a dopant onto a substrate, to form embedded components in the semiconductor. Substrate 1 may be made of a single crystal semiconductor material or any other material, which permits the formation of single-crystal semiconductor layers on the surface thereof. Side ovens 2 are evaporant sources of Pi type semiconductor material which is heated to continuously evaporate onto substrate 1, resulting in growth along the Z-direction. Two side ovens 2 are shown in Fig. 1, though more can be used for better uniformity and faster growth rate. An N-type dopant is evaporated from center oven 3 through holed guiding mask 4. Three holes represented by dotted lines 5 are shown in guiding mask 4 with two located off-center. Guiding mask 4 is movable on the X-Y plane in either translational or rotational motion.

Figs. 2A, 2B and 2C illustrate three basic patterns of the channel which can be achieved: straight, zig-zag, and spiral, respectively. Alternatively, the same patterns can be obtained by fixing mask 4 but moving substrate 1 in a similar manner. Contacts to the channels can be made by evaporating suitable metals through the same mask, with mask 4 and/or substrate 1 held at the position where the evaporation of the semiconductor has just been completed. The channel structures, as shown in Figs. 2A, 2B and 2C, can perform various functions such as resistors, capacitors, inductors and even transformers. If the material grown possesses additional magnetic and superconductive properties, the application of this technique can be widened to encompass these areas. It shoul...