Browse Prior Art Database

Column Locate for Buffered Punch

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000076829D
Original Publication Date: 1972-Apr-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2005-Feb-24
Document File: 2 page(s) / 47K

Publishing Venue

IBM

Related People

Battistoni, RB: AUTHOR [+2]

Abstract

Fig. 1 shows a circuit for advancing the column counter of a buffered card Punch to a column position that is selected at the keyboard. Fig. 2 shows the timing of this circuit operation. In a buffered punch of this type, the card to be punched is held stationary at the punch station until an entire record has been entered into the buffer. The column counter holds the address of the next buffer position where a character from the keyboard is to be entered and in normal manual operation, the column counter is advanced column-by-column.

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Column Locate for Buffered Punch

Fig. 1 shows a circuit for advancing the column counter of a buffered card Punch to a column position that is selected at the keyboard. Fig. 2 shows the timing of this circuit operation. In a buffered punch of this type, the card to be punched is held stationary at the punch station until an entire record has been entered into the buffer. The column counter holds the address of the next buffer position where a character from the keyboard is to be entered and in normal manual operation, the column counter is advanced column-by-column.

Fig. 2 shows the keyboard data signals that occur in every key entry operation. The latch KEYBOARD functions in such an operation and other circuits, not shown, produce the signals DLY3, COMP, G1, G2 and G3 which are shown in the drawing. These signals are described in various other publications.

For a column locate operation, a latch COL LOC is set in response to an input COL LOC SW on a line 2 from a keyboard switch. The operator then keys the first digit of the two digit column number from the numerical portion of the keyboard. This number is converted to binary form in a circuit 3 and is transferred through gates 4 into a four-bit units register 5. Gates 4 are opened by the reset state of a latch CTRL XFER. During the keying of the first digit, CTRL XFER is set in response to a signal DLY3 which identifies a particular point in the keyboard operating cycle. CTRL XFER disables gates 4 and thereby causes units register 5 to hold its existing state wi...