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Acoustic Surface Wave Device for Both Mode Locking and Color Discriminating in Lasers

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000076858D
Original Publication Date: 1972-May-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2005-Feb-24
Document File: 2 page(s) / 30K

Publishing Venue

IBM

Related People

Zory, P: AUTHOR

Abstract

A simple, low-insertion loss, relatively inexpensive acoustic surface-wave device is described, which can be used for both mode-locking and color discriminating in lasers.

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Acoustic Surface Wave Device for Both Mode Locking and Color Discriminating in Lasers

A simple, low-insertion loss, relatively inexpensive acoustic surface-wave device is described, which can be used for both mode-locking and color discriminating in lasers.

The device uses an alpha-quartz prism, as shown in Fig. 1, and is placed in the laser cavity, as shown in Fig. 2. The prism is cut such that Brewster's angle is utilized to prevent reflection losses and critical angle incidence is utilized to obtain 100% reflection at the internal boundary. The fact that no reflection or antireflection coatings are required is advantageous, since their absence simplifies the fabrication of the acoustic surface-wave transducers utilized in the mode-locking. The particular design shown maximizes color discrimination by maximizing the effects of the dispersion of the quartz.

The mode-locking is achieved by establishing a standing acoustic surface wave (SASW) on the critical angle interface at a frequency equal to one-half the intermode spacing of the laser cavity. It is important that the laser beam be incident on the surface supporting the SASW at an angle just beyond the critical angle, in order to take advantage of the fact that maximum light diffraction efficiency occurs in the vicinity of the critical angle.

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